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Category: Spa


What is Forest Bathing?

Travel & Nature Therapy: Shinrin-Yoku/Forest Bathing

“The walking of which I speak has nothing in it akin to taking exercise…I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits, unless I spend four hours a day at least sauntering through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all worldly engagements.”
~Henry David Thoreau, “Walking.”

Montana ranks 44th in population size, but this allows us to be leaders in another way—in our access to nature. The Ranch itself is mid-way between America’s first National Park, Yellowstone and the Crown of the Continent, Glacier National Park. Montanans love having a homestead and venturing out into our vast public lands. It seems the more wide open spaces you see, the more you crave them.


Photo by Caleb Lee

Conversely, the world in general is growing ever more industrialized. Eighty-two percent of North Americans live in an urban setting. With that number projected to grow, scientists are studying the unforeseen physical and mental cost of moving away from natural settings. At the same time the research mounts, we’ve spent the better part of 2017 developing programs that help guests connect with our natural setting, from Montana naturalist classes to Nat Geo narrative photography lessons to natural play environments in the Little Grizzlies Kids Club and natural movement and forest bathing Granite Spa classes.

This week we look at the role of nature in restoring mental and physical health, as well as society’s skepticism toward nature therapy and the power of vacations to get us out of our routine and try new things. Read more…

Category: Spa


Finding Winter Wellness in the Wild

Why a Winter Vacation Might Be Better Than a Resolution

Each year, the scientific evidence mounts suggesting the health and wellness benefits of spending time outdoors. The rise of technology has beckoned us inside, where we stay for more of the day than we may realize. The Harvard School of Public Health recently suggested adults spend as little as five percent of their day outdoors. As our perspectives have become more global, we’ve been slowly allowing our phones, tablets and computers become our windows to the world.

The Rock Creek bridge under a dusting of new snow.

In the winter, it’s even more noticeable. When the weather gets cold, we hibernate. A little rest is great for the body and mind, but we also run the risk of changing our habits to be more insular, inside-oriented and sedentary. As we write this on a computer and you read this on a device, we’re mindful that the Internet is our best friend and worst enemy in the fight for wellness. Read more…